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Zygotically transcribed genes

Calcium binding and calcium dependent enzymes and proteins

THADA regulates the organismal balance between energy storage and heat production

Calcium binding and calcium dependent enzymes and proteins

  • Signaling proteins

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    THADA regulates the organismal balance between energy storage and heat production

    Human susceptibility to obesity is mainly genetic, yet the underlying evolutionary drivers causing variation from person to person are not clear. One theory rationalizes that populations that have adapted to warmer climates have reduced their metabolic rates, thereby increasing their propensity to store energy. This study uncovered the function of a gene that supports this theory. THADA is one of the genes most strongly selected during evolution as humans settled in different climates. THADA knockout flies are obese, hyperphagic, have reduced energy production, and are sensitive to the cold. THADA binds the sarco/ER Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) and acts on it as an uncoupler. Reducing SERCA activity in THADA mutant flies rescues their obesity, pinpointing SERCA as a key effector of THADA function. In sum, this identifies THADA as a regulator of the balance between energy consumption and energy storage, which was selected during human evolution (Moraru, 2017).

    Obesity has reached pandemic proportions, with 13% of adults worldwide being obese. Although the modern diet triggers this phenotype, 60%-70% of an individual's susceptibility to obesity is genetic. The underlying evolutionary drivers that cause susceptibility vary from person to person and are not clear. Since obesity is most prevalent in populations that have adapted to warm climates, an emerging theory proposes that populations in warm climates evolved low metabolic rates to reduce heat production, making them prone to obesity. In contrast, populations in cold climates evolved high energy consumption for thermogenesis, making them more resistant to obesity. This theory predicts the existence of genes that have been selected in the human population by climate adaptation which regulate the balance between heat production and energy storage (Moraru, 2017).

    The gene Thyroid Adenoma Associated (THADA) has played an important role in human evolution. Comparison of the Neanderthal genome with the genomes of current humans reveals that SNPs in THADA were the most strongly positively selected SNPs genome-wide in the evolution of modern humans. Furthermore, as hominins left Africa circa 70,000 years ago, they adapted to colder climates. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified THADA as one of the top genes that was evolutionarily selected in response to cold adaptation, suggesting a link between THADA and energy metabolism. THADA was also identified as one of the top risk loci for type 2 diabetes by GWAS Although follow-up studies could not confirm an association between THADA SNPs and various aspects of insulin release or insulin sensitivity, some studies did find an association between THADA and pancreatic β-cell response or marginal evidence for an association with body mass index. In sum, THADA has been connected to both metabolism and adaptation to climate. Nonetheless, nothing is known about the function of THADA in animal biology, at the physiological or the molecular level. Animals lacking THADA function have not yet been described. An analysis of the amino acid sequence of THADA provides little or no hints regarding its molecular function (Moraru, 2017).

    To study the function of THADA, THADA knockout flies were generated. THADA knockout animals are obese and produce less heat than controls, making them sensitive to the cold. THADA binds the sarco/ER Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) and regulates organismal metabolism via calcium signaling. In addition to unveiling the physiological role and molecular function of this medically relevant gene, the results also show that one gene that has been strongly selected during human evolution in response to environmental temperature plays a functional role in regulating the balance between heat production and energy storage, affecting the propensity to become obese (Moraru, 2017).

    This study reports the physiological and molecular function of THADA in animals. THADA mutants were found to be obese, sensitive to the cold, and have reduced heat production compared with controls. THADA interacts physically with SERCA and modulates its activity. The combination of improved calcium pumping and cold sensitivity of THADA mutants indicates that THADA acts as an SERCA uncoupler, similar to sarcolipin. This interaction between THADA and SERCA appears to be an important part of THADA function, since the obesity phenotype of THADA mutants can be rescued by mild SERCA knockdown (Moraru, 2017).

    Calcium signaling is increasingly coming into the spotlight as an important regulator of organismal metabolism. In a genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila to search for genes regulating energy homeostasis, calcium signaling was the most enriched gene ontology category among obesity-regulating genes (Baumbach, 2014). Cytosolic calcium levels can alter organismal adiposity by more than 10-fold (from 15% to 250% of control levels) (Baumbach, 2014), indicating that it is an important regulator of organismal metabolism. In line with these numbers, THADAKO flies have 250% the triglyceride levels of control flies. The phenotypes observed for other regulators of calcium signaling all point in the same general direction that high ER calcium leads to hyperphagia and obesity. Likewise, mice heterozygous for a mutation in IP3R are susceptible to developing glucose intolerance on a high-fat diet (Moraru, 2017).

    The molecular mechanisms by which ER calcium regulates organismal metabolism are not yet fully understood, but this important question will surely be the subject of intense research in the near future. Calcium levels are known to regulate activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes such as α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which could explain part of the effect of calcium on metabolism (Moraru, 2017).

    THADA mutation leads to obesity due to roles of THADA both in the fat body and in neurons. This has also been observed for IP3R mutants. Calcium signaling regulates lipid homeostasis directly and cell-autonomously in the fat body, as observed in seipin mutants (Bi, 2014) or when Stim expression was modulated specifically in fat tissue. In addition, it regulates feeding via the CNS. Interestingly, while THADA mutant females have elevated glycogen levels, THADA mutant males do not. It is not known why this is the case: it could be due to the higher energetic demand in females compared with males, leading to stronger metabolic phenotypes in females, or THADA might regulate glycogen metabolism differently in the two sexes (Moraru, 2017).

    GWAS identified THADA as one of the top risk loci for type 2 diabetes. The data presented in this study indicates that THADA regulates lipid metabolism and feeding, suggesting that the association between THADA and diabetes may be causal in nature. THADA mutant flies develop obesity, but have normal circulating sugar levels under standard laboratory food conditions. Interestingly, mouse mutants for IP3R likewise do not become insulin resistant under a regular diet, but do become insulin resistant on a high-fat diet. Combined, these data suggest that the primary effect of altered THADA activity and calcium signaling is on lipid metabolism, and that a combination with high-fat feeding may be required to lead to type 2 diabetes over time. This could potentially explain why follow-up association studies did not find links between THADA and insulin sensitivity but did find links between THADA and adiposity (Moraru, 2017 and references therein).

    Insects are ectotherms, meaning that their internal physiological sources of heat are not sufficient to control their body temperature. Nonetheless they do produce heat, and the main sources of heat are either of muscular origin due to movement or shivering, or of biochemical origin from futile cycles that consume ATP with no net work. For instance, bumblebees preheat their flight muscles by simultaneously activating phosphofructokinase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, which catalyze opposing enzymatic reactions, leading to the futile hydrolysis of ATP and release of heat. Drosophila also have mitochondrial uncoupling proteins, which potentially generate a futile metabolic cycle by dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential. It is proposed in this stduy that uncoupled hydrolysis of ATP by SERCA could constitute one additional example of such a futile cycle that produces heat. It cannot be excluded, however, that THADA knockout flies might also have changes in their evaporative heat loss contributing to their reduced thermogenesis. The thermogenic phenotypes in THADA knockout flies are relatively mild, perhaps reflecting the ectothermic nature of flies. Hence it will be of interest to study in the future the metabolic parameters of THADA knockout mice (Moraru, 2017).

    The combination of cold sensitivity and obesity in THADA mutant animals is interesting in terms of the evolutionary origins of the current obesity pandemic. The prevalence of obesity is highest in populations that have adapted to warmer climates, suggesting that people in warm climates evolved reduced metabolic rates to prevent overheating, and in combination with a modern diet this reduced metabolic rate leads to obesity. Interestingly, THADA is a gene that provides support for this theory. SNPs in THADA are among the SNPs genome-wide that have been most strongly selected as humans adapted to climates of different temperatures). Indeed, comparison of the Neanderthal genome with the genomes of current humans reveals that SNPs in THADA were the most strongly positively selected SNPs genome-wide in the evolution of modern humans. The data presented in this study show that THADA simultaneously affects sensitivity to cold and obesity. Uncoupled SERCA ATPase activity is a major contributor to non-shivering thermogenesis. Similar to animals mutant for another SERCA uncoupling protein, sarcolipin, this study found that THADA mutants are sensitive to the cold. This provides a possible explanation for why evolution selected for SNPs in THADA. In addition, THADA, via SERCA, also regulates lipid homeostasis. THADA thereby provides a genetic and molecular link between climate adaptation and obesity (Moraru, 2017).


    REFERENCES

    Moraru, A., Cakan-Akdogan, G., Strassburger, K., Males, M., Mueller, S., Jabs, M., Muelleder, M., Frejno, M., Braeckman, B. P., Ralser, M. and Teleman, A. A. (2017). THADA regulates the organismal balance between energy storage and heat production. Dev Cell 41(1): 72-81. PubMed ID: 28399403

    Zygotically transcribed genes

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